In Hebrew, "Hanukkah" means dedication, and its celebration commemorates the rededication of the Temple in Jerusalem more than two thousand years ago after it was destroyed by foreign invaders. The legend of Hanukkah, known as the festival of Lights, tells of how a small army of Jews led by Juda Maccabee won back the temple, only to find on day's supply of oil left to light the gold menorah (a Jewish religious candelabra); miraculously it burned for eight days. Today, candles are used instead of oil.

Blue is the primary color associated with Hanukkah (it is considered a holy, royal color in Judaism), and it is typically mixed with silver, gold, or white. Here, we combined the symbols of Hanukkah-the menorah, the dreidel (spinning top), and the Star of David-into striking display for a Hanukkah party. A shiny silver tree with crystal-drop accents was added to give height to display and provide a unique "Festival of Lights."

Star of David
A delicate glass Star of David hangs proudly. The six-pointed star, an ancient symbol believed to have magical properties, was not officially adopted as a symbol of Judaism until the 1700's.

Dreidel and gelt
This crystal dreidel adds sparkle to the table amid a sea of chocolate gelt ("money" used in the dreidel game). The dreidel is engraved with Hebrew letters meaning "A miracle happened here." The game dates back to the Maccabees.

Menorah
An elegant silver menorah is a stunning decoration for this holiday table. In each of the eight nights of Hanukkah, an extra candle is lit. The center candle is used to light the others.

Temple
This electronically lit porcelain building is a modern pat of the decorating scheme. It is a model of New York central Synagogue (c. 1839), the oldest Jewish house of worship in continuous use in New York City and a magnificent example of American synagogue architecture.

Festive Table
Twinkling candlelight cast a glow on this decorative table created for an intimate Hanukkah gathering. To honor the holiday's roots, the large candle featured on the table is actually an oil candle, filled with decorative foliage in tones of silver and blue.